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Saturday, January 11, 2014

2013 Taiwan Trip Day 6 Part 1 (Chiang Kai Shek Memorial, Stamp Museum)


Chiang Kai Shek's memorial shrine is really majestic. Enough said. 

For our sixth day in Taiwan, we paid a visit to Chiang Kai Shek's shrine, went to the stamp museum, and went to Taipei 101. I took too much photos in Taipei 101 that I decided to put the photos in another post. 

This is me and my Taiwan based cousin Pauline in front of the music hall that is situated on the memorial property. Yes, the memorial property has a shrine, a music hall, a theatre across it and a giant square to walk on. 



This is the gate post to the property. Isn't it pretty?


The shrine looks really huge relative to the world. The Taiwanese have exceptional respect for Chiang Kai Shek. The property which he lived in is officially banned to have any other building or development and is a park. They have a lot of statues of him around town, with this one inside the shrine the largest I think (?) 

They say that the number of steps upward the stairs is the number of years of Chiang's life... 

This is me near his statue. My uncle told me that back then, the soldiers were even waaay harsher than what they are now. If they hear even just a slight noise they would already hammer the floor with their guns... 



The ceiling just looks so pretty I had to take photo. This reminds me of the time when I was in the Lincoln memorial in 2012... 


This is what I meant when I said that there's a music hall across a theatre in the memorial (they are the two orange roofs). The blue roof behind is Chianng's shrine. 

I also took this photo for fun just because I felt that the lanterns looked really cute... 

These are now photos from the mini museum below Chiang's statue. On display are his clothes, books, medals and awards and other stuff about him and his wife. Would you believe that the car was gifted by Chinese in the Philippines? Too bad he only used it once, though. 


They even made a mannequin/wax portrait of him in his office, and I think that this was literally all the stuff that he used when he was still alive... 


After we paid our visit to Chiang Kai Shek memorial hall, auntie took us for lunch to this small hotpot restaurant. 

This is their hotpot. Amusingly, it has a sour tangy taste to it, like sinigang but not sinigang. Ha ha ha. 


These are the meatballs I think? I didn't try this dish so I am unsure... 

This is a fried taro plank... Nuff said... 

This dish was my favorite. It's mushroom cooked in three cups chicken style, full of basil and caramelized ginger slices. The mushroom chunks themselves are tasty and juicy, and most definitely without the canned mushroom taste...

On our way to the stamp museum, we passed by quite a number of bridal parlors. I wonder how wedding dresses cost in Taiwan... 

And weird as it is, there's this property with a tree branching off of its top. Not sure if the owner built the property around the tree or if the tree just grew and grew that they had to be the one to bore holes in the property to accommodate it. Nonetheless it's very rare to see people who will go this far to care for nature. Chances are any other owner would have just chopped the tree off... 

We also made a short stop for an iwagayaki break. I've seen these sold in the Philippines but here they're called nyokies for a reason I do not know of. 

Basically they have molds shaped like hockey pucks, and on two cavities it pancake batter is placed. The lady then scoops out the filling from a container and adds it onto one of the cavities. Later on she flips the side with the filling and places it on top of the side without filling and leaves it to cook until it becomes a yummy hockey puck shaped snack. ha ha ha that was a mouthful... 


The dents on top of the iwagayaki cakes are not actual dents but nuts and seeds that the lady put. This is because they sell this snack in so many flavors that it's very easy to interchange them once they're cooked and the filling is sealed off of the world. They have custard, cream, cheese cranberry, peanut, taro paste, red bean paste, and a whole other myriad of fillings to choose from that mistakes mean losses in profit, or worse, adverse allergy attacks (especially for those allergic to peanut or milk). 



I ordered the taro flavor for myself since I'm eternally addicted to everything taro flavored... In fact I have a feeling that I like the color purple mainly because of taro... 

This cute dog was waiting on a sidewalk corner and he/she was just too cute I could not resist but to take a photo... Gosh Taiwan has such beautiful pets....

And finally, here we are at the stamp museum! 

There's really just a small amount of people because as we all know, stamp collecting has now been replaced by so many digital and computer based hobbies... 

But either way, the museum is still alive and bustling because it's well-funded. They have this new exhibit as the next lunar year will be the year of the horse. 

They also have displays of stamp collections of various individuals for one lunar cycle (as in these people collected the new year's postage stamps for 12 years). This is why the museum smells very floral as a lot of people send flowers to congratulate their friends and colleagues whose collections have made it to the museum's display shelves... 




And amidst the traditional stamps they also have modern stamps on display like Harry Potter commemorative stamps... 

The other amusing part is that they have a display of stamps around the world dating from waaaay back. I paid attention to the Japanese stamps the most though hahaha. 




This was the cutest stamp of all. I didn't know that there were special stamps made for Emperor Akihito's wedding! 






This was already made into a diorama because as far as I know modern mail facilities now rely on automatic sorters and QR codes and bar codes to get the mail to the right places and right people... 





Was there anyone in your family who was into stamp collecting? Please do tell me in the comments box! 



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